top of page

Let’s Get Real About Fake Plants! Top-3 Easy-to-Grow Common Plants That Are the Real Deal.

Updated: Oct 10, 2021



There is no comparing fake plants to real plants! Live plants reconnect us with nature, tap into our desire to nurture, and are truly decorative.


I received much engagement on our Instagram reel about how you develop relationships with real plants in a way that you can’t with fake plants.

You nurture a living plant by helping it grow, and when your plant baby gets sick, it's personal.


Plants bring us a sense of joy that comes from surrounding ourselves with living things. They also give back by helping with productivity, alleviating stress, and purifying the air. Marie Kondo would agree that plants spark joy! In fact, Marie Kondo once posted a rant on Instagram about fake plants. She didn't like the idea of artificial plants and suggested that people buy real plants!


Plants are also an investment that can be sold or better yet, shared and passed down from generation to generation. As plants grow, they become a natural decor element that can sometimes become works of art.


Plants are a natural part of our ecosystem, while most fake plants made from plastic will end up in a landfill. Many fake plants are made from toxic plastic; although some are silks, those are more expensive and still don’t bring the benefits of real plants.


Google searches for fake plants are almost as high as houseplants. Searches like "fake plants you'll love" or "real-looking fake plants" rank very high.


So what is the real deal? Do fake plants have a place in our homes? They really shouldn’t, and many real plants aren’t challenging to grow at all.


Below are low-fail houseplants to get you started with the real thing. These are also referred to as easy-care houseplants that require little attention. These aren't plants you can neglect because plants are living things. They may go longer without water, or they may thrive in low light, but they can't be neglected entirely. There is a big misconception and myth that these plants thrive on neglect, which isn't true. They may not die as quickly as other plants, but if you neglect them they certainly won't thrive.


Top 3 Low Maintenance Plant Favorites:


1. Snake Plant (Sansevieria | Dracaena)


Sansevieria has many common names, not just snake plants. It's also known as mother-in-law's tongue or viper's bowstring. In Spanish, it's also commonly called 'Lengua de Vaca' or ' cow's tongue' I guess we're too afraid to insult 'la suegra.'


Scientifically Sansevierias no longer fall under the Sansevieria genus but instead have been reclassified as Dracaena Trifasciata. I still haven't embraced this change.


Whatever you call it, it's a survivor! If you've never owned plants, you should start with a snake plant. I keep snake plants in my home, not just because they are low maintenance but also because they make excellent home decor.


So how exactly do you take care of a snake plant? It's effortless, and they are highly adaptable to many indoor conditions.


Water & Humidity:

The great thing about snake plants is that they can go for extended amounts of time without water. There are few plants you can put on a watering schedule. Keep in mind where you keep your plant because it may need to be watered more often if it's in a high light area. You should water your snake plant when the potting medium/soil is completely dry, and be careful not to overwater your plant!


When ready to water, make sure to water thoroughly and all around the potting medium. I like to bring my plants to the sink for a good soak and then drain them completely. I usually place it on a saucer and empty it several times until there is no water coming out of the pot or left on the saucer. Make sure to water the top and bottom parts of the leaves as well. I usually water my snake plant every couple of weeks since it's in a lower light area it takes longer for the potting medium to dry.


Snake plants can also adapt to any humidity level in your home.


Light

Snake plants are also very adaptable when it comes to light. They can adapt to lower light conditions but keep them in medium to bright indirect light for faster growth.


Potting Medium and Fertilizer

Snake plants aren't fussy when it comes to potting medium or fertilizers. You can use any houseplant potting medium or fertilizer; follow the manufacture's instructions. Fertilize spring through summer.


Distinctive Feature:

NASA determined Snake Plants to be one of the most effective plants at naturally filtering out indoor air pollutants. NASA recommended at least two good-sized plants for every 100 sq foot of space.

Propagation

The great thing about snake plants is that they are easy to propagate from a leaf cutting and can be put in water for about 4-5 weeks to root. However, this can sometimes make it more difficult for cuttings to acclimate to the soil.


The recommended method is to propagate by division. Separate the plant by the roots at the base and pot up the new plant in potting mix. When propagating potting new plants, make sure to water and keep moist but not wet.


Now your existing plant has room to grow, and you will have new plant babies to share.


2. Pothos (Epipremnum)

Pothos is another easy-care houseplant with many common names as well, like devil's ivy and hunter's robe. I love Pothos and all of the variegated and neon varieties! I think this is such an underrated and underappreciated houseplant.


They make great hanging plants and look great on a bookshelf.


Water and Humidity

While it's not drought tolerant like snake plants, it's definitely more forgiving than other plants if you miss a few waterings. You can let it dry between waterings; water when the potting mix is completely dry. Also, don't forget to water and clean the leaves to keep away pests and allow for proper photosynthesis.


Pothos will also adapt to lower humidity levels.


Light

For fast growth, it's best to grow in bright indirect light, although it will tolerate low-lighter conditions.


Potting Medium and Fertilizer

Pothos aren't fussy either when it comes to potting medium or fertilizers. You can use any houseplant potting medium or fertilizer; follow the manufacturer's instructions. Fertilize spring through summer.

Propagation

Pothos is one of the easiest plants to propagate. However, unlike Snake or ZZ plants, you can't propagate from a leaf cutting; you need to make sure you cut leaf, stem, and node. Start with a clean pair of shears and cut just below the nodes. Put in water, preferably a clear glass, so that you can watch the roots; make sure to keep the nodes in water. Place in a warm or humid spot with bright indirect light; this will help with root formation. You could start to see small roots as soon as a couple of weeks. You should keep the water clean and refresh it at least once a week or if it turns murky.


Once roots fully form (est. 4-5 weeks), you can transfer to a potting medium. Pothos are so adaptable even water roots take easily to the soil.


Distinctive Feature:

Pothos is also one of the varieties identified by NASA to filter out indoor air pollutants naturally. NASA recommended at least two good-sized plants for every 100 sq foot of space.


3. ZZ Plant (Zamioculcas Zamiifolia)

ZZ plants are extremely resilient! They also adapt to many indoor light and humidity conditions. They grow full and lush and can add a modern touch to any indoor space.


Water & Humidity

ZZ plants can also go a few weeks without watering. They have rhizomes that look like little bulbous potatoes. The rhizomes help retain water. You should still make sure to check the potting medium and water when dry. ZZ plants can also tolerate low humidity levels.


Light

For fast growth, it's best to grow in bright indirect light, although it will tolerate low-lighter conditions.


Potting Medium and Fertilizer

ZZ plants are easy when it comes to potting medium or fertilizers. You can use any houseplant potting medium or fertilizer; follow the manufacturer's instructions. Fertilize spring through summer.


Propagation


ZZ's can be propagated using several methods such as leaf-cutting or separating the stem and leaves with their rhizome (division.) If you have separated the stem and leaves with the rhizomes (little potatoes), you can place them directly in water for further root development or directly in the soil. This is one of the quickest ways to grow more plants from your existing mother plant.


Leaf-cuttings in water

For leaf cuttings, prepare your shears and cut along the stem to separate the leaves. Now you can place the leaf in water or soil. If placing in water, do not submerge the entire leaf in water. Once the cutting has grown a rhizome with roots, you can pot. Make sure to take several leaf cuttings because ZZ plants aren't as fast-growing as Pothos, so rhizome and root development can take months, and some may not take.


Lef-cuttings in soil.

For the soil method, you can take the leaf-cutting and place it straight into the soil. Do not put the entire leaf face down, only about 1/2 of the leaf. This method is often used by commercial growers but can be more difficult to succeed with at home because you need to keep the right balance of light and humidity, and they are slow-growing.


Distinctive Feature:

NASA determined ZZ plants to also be effective at naturally filtering out indoor air pollutants. NASA recommended at least two good-sized plants for every 100 sq foot of space.


In conclusion, there is no reason for you to keep fake plants when these low-maintenance plants are so easy to grow and propagate! Get planting and make it real!

Comments


bottom of page